[vdr] xine tvtime parameters explained

Petri Hintukainen phi at sdf-eu.org
Tue Jul 15 10:28:39 CEST 2008


Lauri Tischler wrote:
> Trying to google for manual, info or article where all parameters for
> xine tvtime command are explained, what they do, why, etc.
> No luck yet,  any pointers ??

Here's the help text from plugin:

---

Advanced tvtime/deinterlacer plugin with pulldown detection
This plugin aims to provide deinterlacing mechanisms comparable to high
quality progressive DVD players and so called line-doublers, for use
with computer monitors, projectors and other progressive display
devices.

Parameters

  Method: Select deinterlacing method/algorithm to use, see below for
explanation of each method.

  Enabled: Enable/disable the plugin.

  Pulldown: Choose the 2-3 pulldown detection algorithm. 24 FPS films
that have being converted to NTSC can be detected and intelligently
reconstructed to their original (non-interlaced) frames.

  Framerate_mode: Selecting 'full' will deinterlace every field to an
unique frame for television quality and beyond. This feature will
effetively double the frame rate, improving smoothness. Note, however,
that full 59.94 FPS is not possible with plain 2.4 Linux kernel (that
use a timer interrupt frequency of 100Hz). Newer RedHat and 2.6 kernels
use higher HZ settings (512 and 1000, respectively) and should work
fine.

  Judder_correction: Once 2-3 pulldown is enabled and a film material is
detected, it is possible to reduce the frame rate to original rate used
(24 FPS). This will make the frames evenly spaced in time, matching the
speed they were shot and eliminating the judder effect.

  Use_progressive_frame_flag: Well mastered MPEG2 streams uses a flag to
indicate progressive material. This setting control whether we trust
this flag or not (some rare and buggy mpeg2 streams set it wrong).

  Chroma_filter: DVD/MPEG2 use an interlaced image format that has a
very poor vertical chroma resolution. Upsampling the chroma for purposes
of deinterlacing may cause some artifacts to occur (eg. colour stripes).
Use this option to blur the chroma vertically after deinterlacing to
remove the artifacts. Warning: cpu intensive.

  Cheap_mode: This will skip the expensive YV12->YUY2 image conversion,
tricking tvtime/dscaler routines like if they were still handling YUY2
images. Of course, this is not correct, not all pixels will be evaluated
by the algorithms to decide the regions to deinterlace and chroma will
be processed separately. Nevertheless, it allows people with not so fast
systems to try deinterlace algorithms, in a tradeoff between quality and
cpu usage.

* Uses several algorithms from tvtime and dscaler projects.
Deinterlacing methods: (Not all methods are available for all
plataforms)

[Linear] Linear Interpolation:
Expands each field independently without blurring or copying in time.
Use this if you want TV-quality with low CPU, and you have configured
your monitor to run at the refresh rate of the video signal.

Full resolution mode expands each field to full size for high quality
fullscreen use.
---
[LinearBlend] Linear Blend (mplayer):
Avoids flicker by blurring consecutive frames of input.  Use this if you
want to run your monitor at an arbitrary refresh rate and not use much
CPU, and are willing to sacrifice detail.

Temporal mode evenly blurs content for least flicker, but with visible
trails on fast motion. From the linear blend deinterlacer in mplayer.
---
[Greedy] Greedy - Low motion (DScaler):
Uses heuristics to detect motion in the input frames and reconstruct
image detail where possible.  Use this for high quality output even on
monitors set to an arbitrary refresh rate.

Simple detection uses linear interpolation where motion is detected,
using a two-field buffer.  This is the Greedy: Low Motion deinterlacer
from DScaler.
---
[Greedy2Frame] Greedy 2-frame (DScaler):

---
[Weave] Weave Last Field:
Only updates the most recent field.
---
[LineDoubler] Line Doubler:

---
[Vertical] Vertical Blend (ffmpeg):
Avoids flicker by blurring consecutive frames of input.  Use this if you
want to run your monitor at an arbitrary refresh rate and not use much
CPU, and are willing to sacrifice detail.

Vertical mode blurs favouring the most recent field for less visible
trails.  From the deinterlacer filter in ffmpeg.
---
[ScalerBob] Scaler Bob:
Expands each field independently without blurring or copying in time.
Use this if you want TV-quality with low CPU, and you have configured
your monitor to run at the refresh rate of the video signal.

Half resolution is poor quality but low CPU requirements for watching in
a small window.
---
[GreedyH] Greedy - High Motion (DScaler):
Uses heuristics to detect motion in the input frames and reconstruct
image detail where possible.  Use this for high quality output even on
monitors set to an arbitrary refresh rate.

Advanced detection uses linear interpolation where motion is detected,
using a four-field buffer.  This is the Greedy: High Motion deinterlacer
from DScaler.
---
[TomsMoComp] Tom's Motion Compensated (DScaler):
Uses heuristics to detect motion in the input frames and reconstruct
image detail where possible.  Use this for high quality output even on
monitors set to an arbitrary refresh rate.

Motion search mode finds and follows motion vectors for accurate
interpolation.  This is the TomsMoComp deinterlacer from DScaler.
---




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